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  • Earlier British writer, authored a history of art and artists' biography, 1685. Aglionby traveled the continent and recorded his recollections on art, among other topics. In 1685, Aglionby published his Painting Illustrated in Three Dialogues based heavily on the Vite de' pittori, scultori ed architetti moderni by Giovanni Bellori (q.v.) published in 1672. Aglionby, noted that in the Netherlands, paintings were common everywhere, even in the homes of tradesmen. He lamented England's failure to produce "an Historical Painter, Native of our own Soyl".
  • Published the volume on Alcalá de Henares and Guadalajara, in the "Art in Spain" series by the Hispanic Society of America.
  • Medievalist; manuscripts scholar New York University. Alexander edited the important Survey of Manuscripts Illuminated in the British Isles beginning in 1975.
  • Author of the first volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series (1947).
  • Historian of Russian art, particularly the traditional Russian art forms of medieval, renaissance and 18th and 19th centuries. Responsible for general histories of art reflecting the ideals of the Soviet period and several histories of Russian art. Professor at the Theatre and Architecture institutes (Moscow University) and the Academy of Art. Associated with Oskar Wulff (q.v.), Viktor Lazarev (q.v.) and N. I Brunov.
  • Photo-documentarian, founder of the Anderson photoarchive. Born Isaac Atkinson, Anderson was raised in Cumberland, England and settled in Rome in 1838. His intention was to be a painter and, under the signature Nugent Dunbar, submitted several works to the exhibition of the Select Society, London, in 1839. In addition to his paintings and watercolors, he periodically sent back drawings for British newspapers. He switched to photography in 1853 after experimenting with the medium for a number of years.
  • Director of the Koninklijk Museum (later Rijksmuseum), Amsterdam. He advised the Baltimore collector Robert Gilmor, Jr. on purchases.
  • Historian of English art.
  • First British architectural historian to treat at medieval building in England as "architecture."
  • Iconographic approach.
  • Deputy Keeper of the Department of Sculpture at the Victoria and Albert Museum, 1966-1979; Director of Christie's, 1979-1990. In 1980 he curated the "European Terracottas from the Arthur M. Sackler Collection" show for the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. He delivered the William D. Finlay Lecture at the National Gallery of Ireland in 2001.
  • Author of the thirteenth volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series (1949).
  • Spanish art history; monograph on the Escorial.
  • Documentary architectural historian
  • Antiquarian, art theorist and biographer in the tradition of Vasari; Librarian to Queen Christina of Sweden, and curator for Pope Clement X. Bellori was raised by his uncle, the antiquarian Francesco Angeloni (1559-1652). He studied from Angeloni's private archaeological collection and drawings by Annibale Carracci, and painting (perhaps with Domenichino) though few artworks by Bellori are known. Bellori became Angeloni's heir at Angeloni's death in 1652. He assembled his own collection of paintings, including those by Titian, Tintoretto, [Annibale] Carracci, as well as coins and medals.
  • Self-taught historian and critic of American art.
  • Published study of Dutch still life.
  • His La Madonna di Santa Maria in Trastevere redated a pivotal panel of painting in the church from the sixth to the eighth century, arguing against the dating of Cesare Brandi (q.v.). Brandi's date has subsequently proven correct.
  • Mannerism; Renaissance Italy; studied the studiolo of Francesco I, Grand-Duke of Tuscany.
  • notes about Bertini Calosso's opinions on Giotto appear in Richard Offner's annotated catalog of the 1937 Mostra Giottesca.
  • Art patronage scholar of XVIII c. Holland.
  • Artists' biographies (basically Florentine) 1530.
  • historian of Czech art; architecture
  • Medievalist art historian. Together with André Grabar (q.v.) his work documented how the dehumanized styles of late Roman Constantinian art led directly to to the spiritualized de-corporal images of the middle ages.
  • Architect and professor of Architecture at University of California, Berkeley. Born initially worked as a San Francisco architect and draftsman. He met Walter W. Horn (q.v.), a UC Berkeley medievalist who asked him to assist with drawings for Horn's publications on medieval architecture. Beginning in 1960, Born and Horn began collaborating on the measurement of medieval buildings, publishing several studies of related Cistercian buildings in England and France. Born went on to a career in architectural history at Berkeley through Horn's encouragement.
  • Art dealer and Director of the Galerie für Alte Kunst in Munich during the Nazi era. Bornheim purchased numerous artworks for Hermann Goering as he was under Goering's protection, together with Kajetan Mühlmann (q.v.) who held the title The Special Commissioner for the Safekeeping of Works of Art in the Occupied Territories. Borchers, employed through the Einsatzstab Rosenberg, researched and cataloged the newly acquired art pieces, many of which were acquired through Karl Haberstock, a Berlin art dealer who sold plundered art works from the occupied nations to Hitler and Goering.
  • Picasso scholar, wrote catalogue raisonne with Pierre Daix (q.v.).
  • Scholar of Italian Mannerism, offered a broad definition of Mannerism; influenced by Gustav Hocke (q.v.) and Max Dvořák (q.v.).Bousquet's 1964 Mannerism book drew inspiration from a number of earlier scholars on the subject. Dvořák noted that Manneristic subject matter greatly expanded, a fact Bousquet expanded upon. Bousquet also drew from the camp of Mannerist scholars, principally Hocke, who saw these artists as the precursors to surrealism.
  • Mannerism in Bologna
  • Medieval stained glass scholar; student of Louis Groecki (q.v.), succeeded him at Musée des Plans-Reliefs.
  • Major scholar of the Parthenon sculpture; associated with the Nazi years of the DAI. During the years when the DAI (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut) in Athens was under Nazi control, he served there under Walther Wrede (q.v.). He received his Ph.D., from the University of Munich. In 1956 he edited the Corpus vasorum antiquorum volumes of the holdings at the Schloss Fasanerie, Adolphseck. Beginning in 1963, Brommer undertook a systematic publication of the entire Parthenon sculpture.
  • "In 1946, again with sponsorship from Sir Keith Murdoch, the Herald Chair of Fine Arts was founded at the University of Melbourne. The first professor was Joseph Burke, an Irishman whose field of expertise was English 18th-century art. Burke collected a significant group of scholars around him, including Bernard Smith, the first Australian art historian, and Franz Philipp, a German Jewish refugee from Vienna. Hoff had a part-time position as a visiting lecturer in this new department. "
  • University of Hamburg professor during the Panofsky/Wind/Tolnay years (1930s); party-line Nazi who remained at Hamburg after racial firings. Burmeister studied art history in Bonn with fellow student Aby Warburg (q.v.). He attended lectures in Munich and was one of the eight students from various universities who attended seminars in Florence in 1889 under August Schmarsow (q.v.) who was attempting to found a German research institute in the city.
  • semiotics and art history
  • Spanish Renaissance art and architectural history
  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, curator of prints -1921. He was succeeded by Henry Rossiter (q.v.).
  • art historian of American art
  • Scholar of renaissance art and architecture.
  • Patronage art historian
  • architectural history of the castle and fortifications
  • semiotics applied to christian iconography
  • Professor of art and architectural history at the school of architecture in Madrid. He published monographs on the cathedrals of Valladolid and Salamanca. Chueca Goitia authored the thirteenth volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series, Arquitectura del siglo XVI (1953).
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